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care reform, one of the authors of this bill, mr. waxman, the ranking member of energy and commerce, from california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: i thank the gentleman for yielding to me. the truth of the matter is no matter how many votes the republicans cast to repeal the affordable care act, and no matter how many distortions they spread about the law, there are some facts they cannot change. they cannot change the fact that because the affordable care act nobody in america can ever again be denied health insurance because they have a pre-existing condition. they cannot change the fact that a woman can never be charged more than a man for the same coverage. they cannot change the fact that a family will never again be left without coverage just because their child's hospital bills got too high. these facts are stubborn. they are inconvenient for my republican colleagues, so they ignore them and they deny them. republicans have voted or will today 50 times to try to take away the basic security and freedom guaranteed by the aff
as a lost ideal? >> we're going to be looking at energy security in the next half hour of "gmt" as the white house says a billion dollars in energy aid is coming to ukraine's way. john kerry has just arrived in kiev as well. so that was our first task, was getting him to wellness. without angie's list, i don't know if we could have found all the services we needed for our riley. from contractors and doctors to dog sitters and landscapers, you can find it all on angie's list. we found riley at the shelter, and found everything he needed at angie's list. join today at angieslist.com [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. but that's okay. you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from liberty mutual insurance. total your car, and we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. learn about it at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? introducing starbucks via latte. instant coffee lovers now have something new to love. still running in t
at kiev business school and from washington, mihala acting director of the council's energy and environment program. jacob, is there much in the way of economic leverage at the u.s. holds in russia? >> cared to the e.u. in my opinion no. you like in europe, for instance, you could move to targeted freezes because a lot of russian least similar to what the former ukraine cocaine leadership had in europe, they had money inside the e.u. and that could be frozen. they don't have as far as i know much money in the u.s. so no, there isn't much. >> how is russia enmeshed in the economy of e.u. and europe more broadly? >> indeed, but the point is that the current situation isn't purely economic. when speaking just about the economy, western countries, european countries are interested in keeping close ties to russia in importing russian gas and exporting technology and investing into huge russian potential. but at the moment since last week we have geopolitical military situation and it prevails on economic. that is why european leaders change their minds and their statement become
energy costs down whether it be in refining where he has the best chemicals to be able to get the most gasoline out of dirty oil, for instance, in the turbo which is what you need to be able to low your -- get more mileage out of each gallon. that's a very important thing. and, of course, he does the cockpits for pretty much everybody. he's done a remarkable job in honeywell, my charitable trust owns it. it's just been a gigantic winner. at one point they asked him about activism and he had a great answer when your stock goes up all the time the activists don't call. good man. >> is it your favorite industrial name? >> definitely. >> really? >> yeah dave cody is a remarkable guy, and yes, i'll admit we are next-door neighbors and he's also a terrific guy in person. >> you can't argue with what he brings to the interview and certainly with the stock as you said. we'll watch that closely along with exxon also having a -- >> yes, down. >>> in the meantime, former microsoft ceo steve ballmer giving a talk to graduate students at the university of oxford's school o
of the leverage that president putin does have. partly, he has the energy, which flows underneath ukraine and supplies so much of europe. and more than that, he has now threatened, we are told, to no longer use the united states dollar as a currency on the world market. what if he did that? maria bartiromo from the fox business network will join us next to talk about the ramifications of such a thing. whether he could do it and what it would mean to our economy. would it, as the russians say, cripple our economy? that's next. t! [bell rings] this...is jane. her long day on set starts with shoulder pain... ...and a choice take 6 tylenol in a day which is 2 aleve for... ...all day relief. hmm. [bell ring] "roll sound!" "action!" [ chainsaw whirring ] humans -- sometimes liferips us up. sometimes we trip ourselveup. and although the mistakes may seem to just keep coming at you, so do the solutions. like multi-policy discounts from liberty mutual insurance. save up to 10% just for combining your auto and home insurance. call liberty mutual insurance at... [ thump ] to speak with an insurance
. we know the structurally the energy market is changing. the loss isn't there. what is more important is the on tohat rwe is holding the guidance and they gave. , the current net income. they said we will make one point $3 billion. that is incredibly important if you are a dividend or stockholder in this company. kitchen seek is a colloquial term for dumping everything that is bad. if the with gusto. it is making savings. and howfunction exciting my life he gets on tuesday. renewables is a part of the business. it is barely 1%. record.ibility is at a that is according to bloomberg industry. that has a significant tale. new business is making record profits and expenditure is also at a five-year low. mothballing old plans. getting ready for 2022. why do i say that? germany comes off line. >> i was going to ask you about that. is a story about the german energy market changing completely. >> if you think about the edict -- green power wants to constitute 45% of energy production. up from under 25%. with energy.ution energy prices have been coming off a month after month. down by 15%. th
an interesting note this morning, there's energy in the ukraine that could supplant the russians as far as being a supplier to western europe. there's a lot of things going on here. we'll hear more about it. this isn't going to go away. >> david molnar, you point out we're hovering around the fifth anniversary of the beginning of this bull market from the lows of march of '09. it's getting long in the tooth. is this market just running out of steam. is this a good excuse to sell today? >> yeah, bill, i think that's exactly what we're seeing here is that the market is a little bit extended, a little bit tired after a big run here off the january lows. we needed to see something come along that would create an impetus for consolidation, even a short-term correction, and this happens to be it right now. i agree with the prior two guests that this is probably going to be a short-term correction. it's not necessarily, you know, a change in trend here, but i would point out we do have friday's employment report coming out that's going to dictate a lot about, you know, the future direction of fed polic
the world. >>ali, shock wave to the energy prices? >> yes, oil prices, that is global, that rose 2%, $105s a barrel now and we are going to feel that at the pumps and the price natural gas in germany and uk jumped 10%. germany is an industrial power house and depends on natural gas for electricity and call coming from russia, 40% of the the natural gas coming from russia through the ukraine and that is not good news. this is not affecting u.s. natural gas. we don't want to see russia pushing europe back into a recession because we all know that hitting us all. >> what other aspects are you looking at? >> i am looking at a guy that bidding plumbing and manufacturing parts and he exports them and invests in a factory operation in crimea, and he's doing this for a while and i am going to talk to him about affecting his business so we are connected. >> thank you, ali and thank you. we have a response to the ukrainian crisis on social media. >> ukrainians are going online and expressing their feelings on what is happening in their crime. a woman is saying she wants peace, not war and take a loo
is exceptionally weak in ukraine. and what's more, the eu imports most of its energy from russia, which is a top oil producer. should putin take the risk and turn off the taps, as he did with ukraine in 2009 and in 2006, it could spell disaster for europe and, perhaps, the u.s. as the "new republic" notes, "any supply shocks in europe that send prices higher will have ripple effects that raise gas prices in the united states." fiona hill is an expert on russia and eurasian affairs at the brookings institution. fiona, thanks for being here. let's start with that question. you do have a lot of criticism of the president saying that he needs to take stronger action. what conceivable stronger action could be taken? >> well, the problem is, as you've just laid out, that the strong action that the president can take really is very dependent on being in lock step with our european allies. the real impact of any sanctions would only be felt on russia if the eu and other key allies are with us in the way that we are all acting together in the sanctions against iran and our dispute over iran's nuclear pro
. why? because rush ha is blackmailing europe over energy. supplies a third of oil and natural gas to the eu. the more oil and natural gas the u.s.a. and canada can produce and distribute, the weaker russia becomes on the world stage i fervently hope president obama understands that finally, there is barack obama's legacy. hear's a satirical picture posted on fox nation showing the contrasting styles of putin and obama. obviously the russian leader sees himself as macho man. the president sees himself as a renaissance man who wants to accommodate. but there is no accommodating putin. and if the u.s.a. looks weak on this one, believe me, we'll pay a heavy price. as will the president's historical reputation. and that's the memo. now for the top story tonight reaction joining us from boston fox news military analyst colonel david hunt and -- am i making mistakes here, mr. whiten? >> no, i don't think so. i would add a few other things to the list. you know, we can be specific with building -- helping central europe get free of russian energy. it's russian energy that's been used agai
of their energy supplies and actually we have seen a significant recession in european leadership over the last ten to 20 years. but we need to act and we need to speak up in favor of the people who are now being overtaken in crimea by vladimir putin's army, his military. and i worry and -- in conclusion i say it's time we woke up about vladimir putin. it's time that this administration got real. and it's also time for us to worry about what vladimir putin will do on eastern ukraine on the pretext that somehow disorder and demonstrations might require russian presence. and my friends, if we allow mr. putin to assert his authority over these areas because of russian-speaking people, that message is not lost on poland, where there's russian population, on romania, on latvia, estonia, lithuania and moldova, and we are on the verge possibly of seeing a move to reassert the old russian empire, which is mr. putin's lifelong ambition. madam president, i've overstayed my time. i thank my colleague from alabama and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: madam president? the presiding officer: the sen
, pointing out that russia is germany's biggest supplier of energy. we know that merkel spoke with our president last night. she spoke with putin several times since the crisis started. could she be a key player in potentially resolving this situation? >> yes. absolutely. i mean, germany, after all, is the most important military and economic power in europe. the problem here, as you rightfully point out, is that most of germany's natural gas supplies run through that natural gas pipelines through ukraine, from russia, to germany. she's already signaled that she's not in favor of imposing economic sanctions on russia. well, if she's not in favor of supporting economic sanctions on -- on russia as well as denying russia a space in the g-8 and turning that into the g-7, it sort of defangs the capacity of the united states to act forcefully with putin if he decides that, well, what -- what matters to him if he moves his forces into eastern ukraine. who's going to stop him. >> yeah, and josh, i also want to touch on the energy and economics issues which are important here. >> yeah. >> a lo
exports travel through the pipelines that go through ukraine, so how is energy factoring in this equation? >> it's vital. we're being aggressive because we don't depend on russian energy, where as the germans, this is a big debate. maybe this is a positive thing that the russians depend on a trade with europe and why putin's backing off now, or does it make the europeans dependent on russia? >> it's fot really an option for russia to stop the exports. that would be self defeating economically. >> true, but we were talking earlier, on monday the russian stock market lost $70 billion, at the same time, vladimir putin spent $50 billion on the sochi olympics, so i think it's the economic costs making it pause now. >> at some point it's got to have enough of an impact on the russian economy that he's sitting up and taking notice. >> yes, that's why the u.s. is pushing harder for economic sanctions. i think the economic issues make him pause. he's unlikely to push further into ukraine with his troops, but if he feels he's going to lose his warm water port in crimea, which this is all about, he
-up. 5.5 million euros per day. russia is a major exporter of energy to europe and a lot of those pipelines go through ukraine. this is a fear premium put into the price of energy and it is affecting our everyday prices. charles: it has applications to the idea this will be east-west, for tat economic sanctions. to a large degree europe needs that oil. sandra: this is also being seen as an opportunity for the united states. the reopen of the discussion of the keystone pipeline, more exports of liquefied natural gas. this could be an opportunity for the united states. charles: oil was already breaking out before this crisis. anything else going on beneath the surface other than the headlines? sandra: it is a safe haven buying. people want to own something other than equities because they see those as the riskiest assets to own right now. charles: a huge move up $31, what is it? gold has one of the roughest years ever last year, now all of a sudden it is seen as a safe haven, why is it a safe haven? sandra: everybody institutionally are piling on. the most bullish they have been on
and offered general goals on taxes, trade, energy, and regulatory curves. pointing outl keep the upbeat economic outlook. >> let me jump in. we know congressional hearings on the budget again next week, including one wednesday with the finance committee chairman wyden. >> talking about breathing room for more -- he is new to the tax-writing panel. he has his own ideas about tax policy. again, it is a forum for airing ideas about the broader economy. you want be seeing the summit -- their democrats be doing own budget plan. the field the december agreement .ut the spending caps in place the republicans will do their own plan, which will contrast with the administration's blueprint. house republicans met and talked about alternatives to the health care law. next week, there is a bill scheduled. what about the bill and what is the current republican strategy? >> they obviously still object to obamacare. i think they have moved away from trying to repeal it. now they are going after individual pieces. the measure coming up next week has the same effect the bill the house passed has. it draw
bilateral and multilateral interactions. energy cooperation talks were canceled. the obama administration has placed a hold on all aspects of bilateral interaction. host: is it enough to have sanctions to influence what is going on in ukraine? the economic situation in russia may be more marvel to economic pressures than most -- may be more vulnerable to economic pressure than most people think. other analysts are not so sure. the russian system is extremely opaque. not a lot of good data is coming out. they have the ability to manipulate that data. has taken the decision that whatever costs or pressure he is to suffer under, willing to take those costs. he still sees the benefits. what is the point of all this? putin, ukraine and crimea are personal issues. many russians believe that crimea is russian territory. the people there identify as russian and crimea should always be a part of russia. there is a nationalistic element , a domestic, political element. has aly, putin long-standing policy of projecting russian power. some will say it is an effort to reconstitute the soviet bloc. i t
at the impact that comes through commodity and energy prices. today, it does not look like this is going to be a deflationary event for the last. that is something we have to be wary of. >> talk about emerging markets and we have elections in india for april and we have a lot of movement in china. without corporate default. are you more cautious than you were? >> i think the answer is that we remain cautious on emerging markets and the growth cycle has not yet got to a pays for a base that benefits the emerging markets and you are seeing the problem come through in china. china knows they cannot rely so heavily on the west for demands and gdp growth on exports. there is also investment spending that has been a big contributor to growth and cannot continue at this sort of pace that it has been. it has to come more from consumer spending and that is hard to generate. there could be a lot of pickups. >> the chief investment officer. we are back into. >> in london, this is on the move in london. we're streaming on your phone and tablet and on bloomberg.com. let's get back to richard. thank y
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economic leverage over ukraine because of the supply of energy. he has some influence in western europe, which still gets 25% of their energy from russia. so i think he's sitting there thinking that, in fact, he probably holds the better hand here for whatever negotiation is to come. >> charlie: do you believe he holds the better hand? >> frankly, based on what i'm hearing out of western europe and the reluctance of the europeans to embrace tough sanctions, i think, at least right now, i think he does. >> charlie: so if the europeans are not willing to go forward with tough sanctions, we're in a bad place. >> i think we are. >> charlie: you also have suggested some of your fellow republicans should tone down their rhetoric. >> well, this is a serious crisis that the west is facing, and, you know, when i -- i spent most of my life in the government at a time when, during immediate crises, people came together and were supportive of the president basically with the old line that politics stopped at the water's edge. i think people, right now while the president is trying to get the allies
of the energy market including pipeline highlighted in blue that run directly through ukraine. jonathan hunt with more on the joeg concern. jonathan, it's the reason europe might not back u.s. sanctioning. >> europe has now become so dependent on energy resources from russia that they are terrified of instigating any sort of sanctions regime against the russians. take a look at these figures on the natural gas supply to europe. the czech republic gets 100% of the natural gas it consumes from russia. greece, 70%. ukraine itself 60%. and germany, 50%. we investigated the huge national ral gas company and perp told then vladimir putin who was then president of russia as well, if you remember, was using this as part of his foreign policy. >> it is a significant tool that is dangerous for europe, absolutely devastating for ukraine and certainly not good for russian democracy, freedom or the united states. >> just so emphasize again, that interview took place in 2006. all those predictions, gretchen, now coming true. >> germany is really key, though, how the rest of europe reacts. >> germany is th
for natural gas and energy from russia to europe. when you look at the region you can see that half of russian exports are to the european union. this is all-important. those are the major pipelines we're looking tlat. in terms of stocks you're not seeing the big dramatic impact at the opening bell that we thought. at worse you had dow futures down 160 points now down about 100. here's the conventional wisdom. russian stock market got slammed. the russian currency slammed. russian businessmen outraged, very concerned about what's going to happen to their economy. now you hear people saying that maybe, just maybe those russian markets are going to be a very powerful diplomat and temper some of the saber rattling we've been seeing, that big reaction in russian markets means perhaps the worst is behind us because why in the world would anybody try to do anything to make markets continue to be unstable there. that's the thinking right now. dow is down about 100 points. >> only two minutes in and more than 100 points. let's bring in our global economic analyst. what's your take. why this quick coll
those countries to succumb to russian blackmail, whether it's about energy or money or anything else. i think there are a lot of tough things we can do, we can suspend russia from various organizations. >> all right. >> we can make her pay a price, i think we will do that. >> good to have you here tonight, sir. >> thank you. >>> while washington scrambles to counter president putin, a number of experienced russia watchers are wondering why anyone is surprised by these events. many feel they have been laid out quite clearly for many years. simon marks is a former bureau chief. simon welcome. you just heard the back and forth i had with congressman engle, and john mccain and president obama. they're talking about international law. who -- does putin care about any of that? >> i think that's the real question, martha. if anything good comes out of all this. it may be a fundamental misconception that one can argue has dogged russia for years, it's finally smashed. the misconception being that vladimir putin craves international respectability. you can hear john kerry talking about it in kie
is so dependent on russia for its daily energy consumption that there's only so far they will ever be willing to push against russia no matter what russia does? so far they've been willing to say they will cancel a summit that was due to be held in russia and they're all saying more or less derogatory things about vladimir putin and his recent actions but not much more. can europe do more? are their hands tied by their dependence on russia in economic terms? can europe go further without hurting themselves? joining us now is p.j. crowley. he's a former assistant secretary of state for public affairs, currently a fellow at the george washington university institute for public diplomacy and global communication. mr. crowley, thank you very much for being here. >> always a pleasure, rachel. >> is there a limit on how hard the eu and the u.s. will push russia on this or any other issue? >> i think there's a style difference. europe prefers coordination, consultation, you know, convincing argument as opposed to confrontation. and obviously at 28 it's difficult to get consensus within th
't been more aggressive with regards to russia. it's because of their energy dependance on russia. one-third of the national gas coming from russia ironically through ukraine. and you made a very important point there, we know in many cases oligarch has ties to london and that's why the uk, too, may not want to be more active than someone else. i think the eu is going to remain pretty passive here and they will continue to find a peaceful and diplomatic way to solve this crisis. >> certainly something that angela merkel and the germans have been pushing for over the last couple of days. we'll come back to you later in the show. joining us now is benwa ann from societe generale. you were saying yesterday that we need to take a central strategy here particularly where central europe is concerned. has your view changed given what we've heard about the troops in russia right now? >> the situation remains quite volatile. so it's probably too early to make a final call on this, as we discussed earlier the situation is evolving and we are still in much more on the bull markets. but you're rig
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and can fund the development of a lot of energy infrastructure, that will drive road, rail, and other transportation infrastructure we're talking about. you need a private sector impetus. dry?sentially the pot is the piggy bank is empty? >> it pretty much is. highway funding is done. vehicle miles traveled have been dropping. gas tax revenues are falling. the need for a public-private partnership. you have private money coupled with public management. why can't we get that done? >> that does happen. but the economic incentive has to be there. we start natural gas exports and crude oil exports. the prices equalize between the center of the u.s. where the crude oil piles up in barrels and the rest of the world -- you can have it better environment for private investment and international energy agency's have estimated that it is in the trillions of dollars, the infrastructure investment, to man come in to develop our resources of energy in the u.s.. do investors look at president obama's infrastructure proposal with any degree of belief or is it something that they say it has been propo
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on exports and direct investment in the russian energy infrastructure and business -- >> you think that's sufficient to back off -- i want to get our other experts in. but so far they're not connected or at least not connected with me. i apologize to the viewers on that. we'll get them on. let me stay with this, benn steil. german's foreign minister has been making unpersuasive sounds in all the reports today. he doesn't seem to want to go along with the drill about preparation for g-8 or not going to the g-8 meeting in sochi. i haven't heard a thing. you ascribe that to natural gas? that's it? >> it's not just natural gas. it's the business that german industrial outfits like siemens are doing within russia. and the russians know very well when they invaded the breakaway georgian republics like south ossetia in 2008, the west did absolutely nothing. so this is playing according to script. >> do we have general mccaffrey? >> i think so. >> i beg your pardon, for whatever snafu we had. let me ask you the question about this 5:00 a.m. deadline and whether russia is going to tell ukraine t
-- of its energy from russia, from russian natural gas. sometimes it goes even higher than that. so they are going to be very reluctant to do the kind of comprehensive sanctions which would deprive them of that energy. and as you point out, london's role as a financial center is dependent upon other things, russia's capital. i think we should push for as comprehensive sanctions as we can get. you're never going to get totally comprehensive sanctions, but they do exact a price. and what we're trying to do here, as i see it, what the united states is trying to do with many members of the international community, make russia pay some price, some significant price, isolate it, and send a signal that this is not how we want business to be conducted in the 21 s century. you're not going to be able to stop it in its tracks. you're not going to be able to send troops into crimea. but the fact that we can't get 100% leak proof sanctions doesn't mean we shouldn't try to raise the bar and exact some price. >> i would like you to listen, fareed, to what the secretary of state, john kerry, said
. steel, power producers. 65% of the energy needs are produced by: this country and a lot of these producers are around the city of beijing. they do not necessarily have the filters on the smokestack and that is why we get stuck with the smog. today, absolutely what they call a blue sky day here in beijing. it oftentimes is the opening of the biggest party. temperatures drop, skies clear, and then they all gather and do their thing. like magic. stephen engle reporting their live from beijing. to reducetic evidence issues in the crimea, they consider a loan to help pay its debt to the national gas exporter, gaza problem -- ga zprom. ryan chilcote filed this report. >> in independence square, calling on the men in the crowd to sign up for the ukrainian army to take on russian forces in crimea. theexpectation here is that next round may not involve troops at all. the ukraine relies on russia for most of its energy. they use the natural gas to fuel its industry and heat homes. that reliance will be russia's next weapon. they could punish the ukraine by cutting the gas off alto
on the gaspron export account with his for gazprom, the giant energy company majority controlled by the russian government. they were working both those accounts and setting up both. that's how it works in washington. >> are they all american citizens? >> they are, as far as i can tell. we called all of these firms for comments. none would call us back except for maslansky, who said they didn't see anything wrong working for the russians. we didn't have a chance to ask key questions like that, but looking at the bios on a lot of these web sites, it does appear that the majority of them are american citizens. >> if they're not, we can throw them out. this leads to another point i made at the top of the show. people coming in from russia or wherever, and i'm especially thinking about the oligarchs, who like to travel freely, there's the act that allows personal sanctions or revoke visas. basically either throw foreigners out or not let them in. the president has the authority. that bill was passed just a couple years ago. now it could be a powerful weapon. >> what is interesting here is the forei
. this is all because of what's happening in ukraine? >> you have the biggest energy user. we see these spikes in oil when we have tensions rise in the middle east, and then they come back down again when you see those recede. when people talk about trade sanctions, you can see how it could hit the likes of russia. 20% of their national income comes from natural gas alone. so it could hurt them. you have to say, russia is not iran. i was looking at some of the stats from b.p. statistical review. a third of natural gas imports into e.u. come from russia. any kinds of trade sanctions there would hurt russia, and it would hurt europe, too. >> and there are questions raised about what will be the spongs in terms of sanctions, but also what will be the russian response with regard to gas supplies. the gas problem has been suggesting it could end natural gas discounts to ukraine and that could have effects to the rest of europe. >> it would definitely do that. the gas problem today is one of the biggest in the equity market down to almost 10%. they are -- down almost 10%. they are getting hit hard.
of energy based on the idea that we could see sanctions on russia. obviously, we're waiting today for further news on just what action the west is going to take. but right now, we're seeing brent and u.s. crude higher in trade this morning. the dow is down around 0.8%. we've got dollar/ruble trading at five-year highs. i mentioned those actionses and the potential oil impact, gas impact. gazprom one of the key losers for the russian market. we've got a broader impact as far as the russian markets are concerned than what we're seeing in poland, as well. so the real dominating factor is the ukraine. thousands of russian troops are focused in the crimea region following a dramatic weekend in the ukraine. this is a declaration of war by vladimir putin. u.s. secretary of state john kerry condemning russia's actions and will travel to kiev tomorrow for talks with the new ukrainian government. >> president putin is using force in a completely inappropriate manner. fears he's going to lose on the international stage. russia is going to lose. >> steve, it's the one possible benefit of seei
europe want to be as dependent upon russian energy? that gas pipeline going through ukraine, providing a huge amount of the heating fuel for western europe. is the united states going to think differently about exporting oil, about exporting more gas in the future to supply our allies abroad. >> john buss, live with us. thank you very much. >> eninvestors reacting reactina big way. causes chaos. early trading dow was down a couple hundred points. analysts believe the cries is putting investor risk-taking on hold. the ruble is all time low against the dollar. gold and u.s. government bonds are doing very well. safe spots. so people are putting these in other places, a flight to safety sends you there in russia, president putin's military amibitions are having economic consequences. the main index there plummeted at the end of trading today, 13%. impossible to predict how the crisis we play out. >> in other news, developments in the case of justin pelletier, that teenage girl on whom we have been reporting, doctors took her from her family. court victories for the parents and now we're h
, angela merkel of germany said she wasn't keen on the idea. a lot of energy flows from russia and through russia into western europe, to ukraine and other places as well. it will be a test of the president to see, you know, whether he can rally the international community, as he's fond of calling it, to actions that will matter to vladimir putin. >> to all the talk of feckless international policy and the inability to do anything about this and they're not looking at military options, there are still levers this administration can pull, as you mentioned, the g-8, other economic levers, freezing bank account, that could have a significant impact. >> yeah, john kerry was even talking about some of them. these things matter. look, we saw the country, even as isolated a country as iran was crippled by sanctions. i'm not saying that we're capable of doing the same thing with russia, but it is an example of what these kinds of financial sanctions can do. they can make people within the country feel it, and the country as a whole feel it. russia's economy is not great. and it needs trade with na
-benz financial services. through mercedes-benz ♪ through mercedes-benz oh, there's an energy crisis happening alright. a human one. and it's time to fight it. quaker's good energy is just what you want. it's how we help keep go-getters like you... going... and getting. one bite at a time. try new chewy sweet & salty. a crave-able combo you gotta eat to believe. >>> it's 7:26. i'm laura garcia-cannon. we do have an nbc microclimate weather alert as we give you a live look in san jose and palo alto this morning. the rain had been coming down quite heavily throughout the morning. let's check in with christina with a look at the forecast. >> here's something you don't hear about often, a flash flood warning in the bay area. it's one of the areas where a lot of people have to travel through to get to work along the peninsula. where we're in green between redwood city and san jose. this is slated to expire in a couple minutes but what's happening we're getting all of this runoff off of the mountains impacting the morning drive. we stop the radar. the rain from san francisco all the way down the pen
in energy aid to the ukraine. we'll keep you posted on this as we learn more coming in live right now. >>> and then today starts a senate debate on the nominee to head the civil rights division at the department of justice. he is now facing harsh criticism for defending that cop killer in court. the widow of that fallen police officer spoke with us earlier this morning on "fox & friends." listen to what she had to say. >> my husband would feel that this is evil, it's unjust, and they really need to look at the facts of who this man is that they are nominating. >> she says she's been trying to speak to the senate about this nomination, but she's getting no response from senate leadership. not even getting her phone calls returned. >>> a minnesota high school is under fire this morning after forcing this freshman to stand outside for ten minutes in the freezing cold in a wet bathing suit. the 14-year-old was in the school's pool when the fire alarm went off. a small science experiment triggered the alarm and the teen-ager was rushed out of the building with no time to put on any dry clo
to the world economy. that's the help of many countries. russia's economy is dependent on energy crisis. russia supplies much of europe's gas through pipelines that crisscross ukraine. during disputes, russia cutoff the pipelines causing them to soar. russia's stocks took the steepest dive in five years. let's take a look at how the stocks are doing. the dow is down a little over 160 points. let's bring in the host of quest means business in london. richard, how are the stocks reacting in london where you are. >> in all the markets you are seeing, heavy sell offs. in germany. the index closed down 1/2 1/2%. germaniy has huge business relations the. a lot of economic interests with russia. if there looks to be any form of sanctions and economic effect between the west and russia, germany is one of the first economies that will certainly feel the pinch on this side of that. london was down 1 1/2%. paris similarly. ukraine as such economically. both because of those pipelines and because any form of economic standoff between russia, the united states, the european union is absolutely so serious, t
this power plant can produce enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ >>> it looks like russian forces are consolidating on crimean. up to 12 trucks of russian troops have crossed into the eastern city of kerch from russia and the movement is being described by ferry. how far will russia go? the retired u.s. army general is joining me. thanks for coming in. if you take a look at russian forces versus ukrainian forces, 845,000 russian troops, 129,000 russian troops, tanks, two to one, combat aircraft, nearly 1400. russian combat aircraft, 221. there's no match. >> no. >> between those two militaries. so if it came down to a war between ukraine and russia, it's over. >> but ukraine has -- is part of a much larger organization in the european community and i don't think it would just be russia against ukraine. >> let's talk about that. let's hope the russias don't decide to move beyond crime and move eastward toward kiev arguing that the president yanukovych, he's still the president, he needs help to --
between russia, ukraine, and germany with a flow of energy? >> that is really the threat point that russia has in all of this, is europe is crucially dependent on natural gas, most of which comes from russia. that is always the -- obviously, russia needs to sell the natural gas, too. so far, that is why it has been stable. >> there's a terrific book "command and control" about the u.s. history and the disturbing -- clearly still on the minds of germans. >> casting a long shadow of the history. we will be back and talk about real estate. how can a real estate company survive commission-free? that is coming up next on "bloomberg surveillance." ♪ >> this is "bloomberg surveillance." let's get you some company news. a hiring spree in asia. they have hired hundreds of engineers and supply chain managers in china and taiwan. triesring comes as apple to speed product development and introduce a wider range of devices. ebay director firing back at carl icahn saying he recused himself from deal talks when ebay sold skype to a group of investors that included his venture firm. carl icahn has accus
. a 22% gain in profit. he is so ingrained within the u.s. economy. he has holdings in energy, infrastructure, trucker and, banks, more than 80 companies. interesting exception, his second-biggest -- coca-cola. fears about sugar content, where word about our health. that one did not pay such good dividends. what did pay good devin -- dividends is heinz. he has done particularly well 280it seems the company -- billion dollars is what it is worth. it keeps on growing. >> he usually says don't rate me on my share price increase. remy how i do versus the s&p 500 on a dividend basis and over the past five years. tends to be net worth versus the s&p 500. it is not done as well. for 44 straight years he outperform. end of 2008, it has risen 80%. >> it has been an incredible year. caroline hyde, our european business correspondent. next-generation biofuel. stay tuned. we will tell you about it when i come back. ♪ >> next generation biofuels. they have been described as bridging the gap between agriculture and advanced materials. with companies like shell opening manufacturing plants
plant can produce enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ wake it up with olay regenerist. formulated with a skin energizing complex, it penetrates 10 layers of the skin's surface. because energized skin is younger looking skin. ♪ >>> this is the only plan in the state for voting hours that we could get consensus from democrats and republicans on. >> it calls for early voting monday through friday, 8:00 to 5:00 for the four weeks in october as well as the last saturday in october and the first saturday in november 8:00 to 4:00. but critics, including peg rosenfield of the league of women voters, say there should be evening hours as well as some sundays. >> you may have just felt an odd sensation of chilling deja vu after seeing that recent footage about voting hours in the still hugely decisive perennial battleground state of ohio. because just like in those terminator movies when the seemingly defeated cyborg rises up to keep on terminating, the attempt to restrict voting has risen once
orchestrated this closer ties to the west.. they're scared to death that russia -- they get all their energy from russia. they're worried. so here at home, president obama is going to unveil his -- what a concept, a budget. the 2015 budget plan today. >> we've got one every year. and among its divisions an expansion of the earned income tax credit designed to help lower income americans. the budget is having little chance of passage in the republican-controlled house. and in house budget committee ranking member chris van holen is going to tell us about that when he joins us later this hour to discuss the budget proposal at about 7:40 eastern time. and the controversy over bitcoin, a prime topic in japan, the country's finance minister says the country is still investigating the collapse of mt. gox, which was based in tokyo. it's still uncertain whether illegal activity was involved. >>> and new york state's chief banking regulator ben imam lochti, says that that collapse ultimately could be a positive for digital currencies -- we've got to get these bad actors out of here. it's growing pain
.s. with the department of energy contract three times in the 1960's. well i could not get any information declassified what otto ambros was doing and his program but neither could president ronald reagan. i thought otto ambros had to come to the united states as a convicted nazi war criminal so i freedom of information act request about his travel who he came here and who he was sponsored by and that was lost or classified. it probably is not. but i bet some curious journalists in the future will. [applause] [inaudible conversations] . . both programs re-air on booktv this sunday starting at 7:00 p.m. eastern and are available to watch any time on line it booktv.org. >> what we are told both the students and as a nation in terms of popular imagination is that there's all kinds of sit-ins and marches and demonstrations that occurred but they are really done by these famous iconic people. basically as rosa parks who just was so tired as she refused to get up from the bus in montgomery alabama and sparked the bus boycott and basically a young preacher who the president referred to during the election as
they crashed twitter with that retweet. they were all in such a good mood last night, the energy was fantastic and it really translated to the tv. >> reporter: i don't want to call myself a thief but i did get you a gift. >> you didn't steal that oscar. >> reporter: and the oscar goes to michaela pereira. >> it's chocolate. >> reporter: i got really high there. that is not going to be eaten. >> i was robbed. i was robbed. it was politics. >> you're supposed to say i was just honored to be nominated. >> i say go with authentic. i showed up because i thought i was going to win. >> what a fun night for lupita, what a fun night for her brother. >> coming up on "new day," we're going to take you back to the crisis in ukraine. it's a battle about sovereignty but it's also a battle about east and west and russia. it could have an effect in the global economy and we're going to tell you why. [ garner ] there's a lot of beautiful makeup out there, but one is so clever that your skin looks better even after you take it off. neutrogena healthy skin liquid makeup. 98% saw improved skin. does your makeup d
though it's this large energy producer. the putins of the world can't, if you will, opt out of the consequences of globalization. >> coming up on "morning joe," congressman paul ryan been here to discuss president obama's new budget. also ari fleischer will join in the conversation. and coming up, she's going up against governor de blasio. >> it's a rough start. >> and "morning joe" packs its bags and goes to arkansas. kasie hunt is here -- >> kasie was -- >> i can't remember exactly what happened but, what. >> well, kasie has the piece there. >> that was sort of a delay by about 20 years but it's great. >> right. let's go to bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill. >> good morning, everyone. arkansas was a nasty place to be on the road yesterday. i-40 was closed for a while. even the national guard had to be called out to help some of the people of arkansas. the ground hog said we have one more week of winter left. looks like he's probably about right. 50% of the lower 48 still covered in snow, third greatest snow cover for this late in the winter season. and we have
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